Grand Slammed


It is worth reading Peter Busch's blog entry from 2014-08-09 but to save you the trouble of doing that right now, the subject hand is reproduced below.


K J 8 6 4 3 2
8
A 6 5 2
4

10
6 5 4 3
Q 10 9 8 4
J 5 2

N

W

E

S

9 7
Q J 9 7 2
K 7
Q 9 8 3

A Q 5
A K 10
J 3
A K 10 7 6


Peter held the north cards and, playing Precision, he and his partner bid this hand to a fine contract of 7♠. Peter describes how, with twelve tricks on top, he used the several entries to dummy to ruff two rounds of clubs and so develop the thirteenth trick in that suit.

After reading Peter's blog entry in the middle of December I was struck by its similarity to this hand which I had played at Malanda Bridge Club on 2014-12-01.  Like Peter I held the North cards.


A K 9 8 5 4 2
A 4
A
8 7 4

J
3
K J 10 7 6 5 2
K J 10 5

N

W

E

S

9 7
Q 10 8 7 6
9 8 4 3
Q 9 3

Q 7 6 3
K J 9 5 2
Q
A 6 2


In 2012 I started playing bridge again after a 43-year hiatus. It is probably obvious to most people at the club that bidding is by far the weaker part of my game. With that in mind I was particularly proud of the way that this Bjørg and I bid this hand (board 21). I opened 1♠ and heard 4 from partner. This was a "splinter" promising 4 trumps and a shortage in diamonds. The rest of the auction was a neat series of cue bids:

1♠ 4
4 5
5 5
7♠

This waa a beautiful bidding sequence leading to a superb contract.

The opening lead was 7 and when dummy's 9 held the first trick I could see 12 tricks comprising seven spades, three hearts, a diamond and a club. Just as in Peter's example, I could see that the best chance of a 13th trick was to ruff two of dummy's long suit (hearts) to establish the fifth one. I was much better off than Peter in that his opponents had held 7 outstanding cards and he needed to find a 4-3 split, a 62% probability, whereas in my case the opponents held just six cards and I could tolerate a 4-2 or 3-3 split which meant an 84% chance of success.

Of course the split was 5-1.One down. So much for good bidding.